• Title I is a federally funded program, enacted in 1965 under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), committed to closing the achievement gap between low-income and minority students and their peers. The most sweeping reform of ESEA occurred in January of 2002 with the signing into law of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). No Child Left Behind changed the focus of the Title I Program from a remedial track with low expectations for disadvantaged children to a high-performance program dedicated to helping eligible children meet the same challenging academic standards that States are required to establish for all children. The basic principles of Title I state that schools with large concentrations of low-income students will receive supplemental funds to assist in meeting student’s educational goals. Low-income students are determined by the number of students enrolled in the free and reduced lunch program.